Tuesday, May 31, 2011

The Art of Conrad Roset

If I've said it once, I've said it a hundred times, my heart goes all a-flutter over pencil sketch work. Barcelona artist, Conrad Roset, amplifies my adoration of simple drawings by taking it to new heights with water color.

For an interesting "over the shoulder" view of his work, be sure to watch the video below.

Conrad's drawing from conrad roset on Vimeo.

You can see more of Conrad's artwork at conradroset.blogspot.com.

Saturday, May 21, 2011

Objets d'Yarn n'Thread

Arghhh... they're at it again! Right on the heels of my Painted Trees blog, I've learned that extreme knitter's and crocheter's are also expressing their artistic urges upon trees (live ones this time) and other structures. (A bus?... really??)

There's something a little more cozy and organic about swaddling objects in yarn verses slathering them with paint. But I must confess that the concept and the extreme effort to weave their magic on such a grand scale and in such an unconventional way intrigues me and bolsters my belief that people marvelously know no creative bounds.

Here's a smattering of Objets d'yarn n'thread...

In 2005, as part of a public art project commissioned by Heights Arts, an initiative in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, Carol Hummel, along with her two daughters and mother, crocheted this tree jacket which took 500 hours to construct and 200,000 feet of synthetic craft cord yarn.

In 2011, Polish artist Agata Oleksiak (a.k.a. "Olek") pays homage to Banksy in downtown Manhattan by crocheting one of his most famous pieces: "Balloon Girl" (a.k.a. "Girl with Red Balloon").

Portland based artist, Theresa Honeywell, knitted this acrylic yarn motorbike cozy displayed in 2006.

Made from 100% cotton string, this spider web constructed by textile artist, Liliana Crespi, was part of a sculpture installation in Key West, Florida in 2009.

2010, Lisbon, Portugal based artist, Joana Vasconcelos, displayed this intricate piano cover, made out of white cotton yarn, at the Haunch of Venison Gallery in London. (Haunch of Venison?)

With the help of over 1,000 fishwives of Santa Maria, Portugal in 2008, Vasconcelos crafted this 5,000 foot wide, 800 lb. bedspread as a tribute to the working women who contributed to the project.

2008... In an effort to "humanize the urban environment" Magda Sayeg, founder of Knitta Please, and a team of helpers covered this abandoned bus over a period of five days in Mexico City.

(source article and image credits)

Monday, May 9, 2011